CPSC 683 - InfoVis

exploring information visualization

Date

October 18, 2017

Mandelbrot Set Visualisation

http://visualizingmath.tumblr.com/ A Mandelbrot set is a set of complex numbers. Someone used excel cells to visualize by applying the fill color for each cell corresponding to each pixel in the Mandelbrot set’s continuously colored environment. It took around 3-6 minutes… Continue Reading →

Ornitographies

I found this collection of birds, photographing the patterns of how they move. This seemed especially relevant to yesterday’s conversation about observing nature to gain inspiration. In this, you can see how a flock of birds would land on the… Continue Reading →

Percentage bars – pie / rainbow style?

October 15, 2017 I enjoy this visualization.  It’s simply.  It has an easy to digest layout and utilized the “empty” (grey) space as an additional statistic.  I feel like this would be an interesting design incorporation if layered onto other… Continue Reading →

Venn style!

October 14, 2017 Had to copy this directly from the website because it was of interest “We strive to unite identified leaders of business, academia, professionals, and politicians to use their influence/resources/positions to effect an enduring, comprehensive and effective response… Continue Reading →

Housing and rent subsidies

October 13, 2017 According to an article written for the star “giving the homeless a place to live costs less than providing shelters and emergency services”.  The infographic gets you thinking.  I like that.  I wanted to learn move.  Naturally… Continue Reading →

Lets go this way!

October 12, 2017 Definitely think the flow and patterns often formed by a flock of birds is a wild, natural way to present data (i.e. swarming).  Mimicking, well that definitely might be a challenge but I definitely dig the raw… Continue Reading →

Love the association with the earth’s crust that the colour and layering is evoking.

Wearable data

I’m not exactly sure what this is a graph of, because I don’t have a Pinterest account so the site won’t let me view it directly 🙁 But I came across this necklace which was described in the caption as… Continue Reading →

Election results need a vis?

This is how the City of Calgary has chosen to represent the election results on their website. You’d think it would have been easy enough to at least supply a bar graph. Anyone else think this could have been done… Continue Reading →

Heart rate spectrogram

I came across this in an Apple patent for a new method of measuring blood pressure. There is so little distinction between lines and shades that I’m not even sure what’s going on in this visualization. I suppose this is… Continue Reading →

MS Research cognitive API for photo analysis

I dabbled with Microsoft Research’s “cognitive API” to mockup a concept of computational ethnography – using software to crack open media that might be used to document an event – to expose metadata generated about the content of an image,… Continue Reading →

Circuitry LEDs

(http://www.electroschematics.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/led-circuit.gif) During my undergrad years there was a period where I was really into circuitry and always tried to use LEDs to make projects extra flash-y. The above is just a simple representation of an LED in series with a… Continue Reading →

More Jewelry Physicalizations

https://www.shapeways.com/product/E43HBKYSV/4-parameter-malaria-ring-size-7?optionId=60168068&li=marketplace , Linked October 2017 Malaria Ring – David Schneider “This ring tracks the progress of a malaria infection in a mouse from health through sickness and back to health.  The four parameters plotted are Parasite load, Granulocytes, Red Blood… Continue Reading →

360° Book: Mt. Fuji

October 18 I found this book to be quite inspiring for designing 3D data visualizations. Perhaps could be applicable in mixed reality environments as well. “Drawing on both art and architecture, the award-winning 360° book allows the reader to get a… Continue Reading →

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